Solar energy panels can your home use them

Solar energy and utility cost savings

You’ve probably seen solar energy panels scattered over fields or perched high on building rooftops. You may even have a house in your local neighborhood with solar energy panels on their roof. Perhaps you’ve also wondered whether it might not be a good idea for you to install them on your home as well. You’ve heard a lot about the clean, free and renewable energy they deliver. Maybe it’s time for you to also get in on the action and cut back on those ever-growing utility costs.

Are solar panels right for your home?

The quick answer is almost certainly: yes. The long answer is a bit more complicated and will largely depend on a variety of factors. One of the questions we get posed most often is whether solar energy panels work in bad weather conditions. So, the kind of weather in your location is probably a factor you too are thinking about. Next, there is the question of your willingness to pay for the cost of the kind of solar energy system you will need. A well-designed system will mean outlaying cash up front to supply your home’s power requirements. Is the long term saving worth the immediate cost?

Weather and its effects on solar energy panels

Basically, photovoltaic (PV) or solar energy panels need sunlight to do their job. After all, that’s the energy source you’re trying to tap into. So, does this mean you need to have access to clear skies and direct sunlight for a majority of the year in order for the system to function adequately? Not necessarily.

Even when it’s overcast outside, photons from the sun’s rays are still getting through the clouds. Solar panels can still pick them up, although it depends on the cloud cover and the type of panels you have. So how much can they soak up in bad weather conditions? The estimate is 10-25%, again depending on the panel type, and also on how cloudy it is outside. So, while direct sunlight is still much better, of course, it’s nice to know the system can still get power from the sun even during cloudy periods.

If your town is beset by snowy winters or barraged by strong winds constantly, don’t worry. The panels are designed to handle harsh weather conditions such as those. In some cases, the cold temperature and snow can also help the photovoltaic energy absorption. In short, as long as you have a good amount of days in the year where direct sunlight is assured, then your home can definitely use a solar energy system.

Is a solar energy system a viable option for your budget?

Once you know whether or not the weather conditions are fine for the system of your choice, you will then need to purchase your system. It’s not cheap, but there are numerous financing options available to spread out the financial blow. A well-designed solar power system can be built up over time. You can start with a more basic system and add units as you require them. Your installation company will discuss this with you when they come to give you your free estimate.

Solar panels are efficient and long lasting

What’s more, you can end up saving thousands of dollars in the long run thanks to electricity bill savings. Did you know you can install a system that can meet over 90% of your household’s electricity requirements? That means your electricity bill will be reduced to almost zero! That kind of value over the lifespan of your purchased photovoltaic system definitely offsets the initial expense on your part. Bear in mind also, that warranties can cover up to 25 years of constant use, so the savings are ongoing.

Contact us now at Renewable Energy Corporation, Maryland’s leading solar energy system provider to find out all your options. We will provide you with a no-obligation, free assessment of the system you will most benefit from.

We will also explain the amazing benefits of the “Net Metering” system.  On sunny days your solar energy panels will always deliver more energy than you need for that day. Net metering feeds that excess back to your utility suppliers, for your credit. This means even more savings, and freedom from the commercial energy grid.